Online science fair seeks next generation innovators

The third annual global Google Science Fair has been launched to find the next generation of scientists and engineers.

The Google Science Fair, staged in partnership with CERN, the LEGO Group, National Geographic and Scientific American,  i students ages 13-18 to participate in the largest online science competition and submit their ideas to change the world.

For the past two years thousands of students from more than 90 countries, including some from Africa, have submitted research projects that address some of the most challenging problems we face today. Previous winners tackled issues such as the early diagnosis of breast cancer and improving the experience of listening to music for people with hearing loss.

Google notes in its Africa blog that last year, 14 year old high school students Sakhiwe Shongwe and Bonkhe Mahlalela from Swaziland made it to the finals and were the inaugural winners of the Science in Action prize with their Unique Simplified Hydroponic project aimed at reducing food shortage in Swaziland. 

The deadline for submissions for this year’s Science Fair is April 30, 2013 at 11:59 pm PDT. 90 regional finalists will be names in June, after which the judges will select the top 15. These finalists will be flown to Google headquarters in Mountain View, California for the final event on September 23, 2013.

Prizes for the 2013 Science Fair include a $50,000 scholarship from Google, a trip to the Galapagos with National Geographic Expeditions, experiences at CERN, Google or the LEGO Group and digital access to the Scientific American archives for the winner’s school for a year. Scientific American will also award a $50,000 Science in Action prize to one project that makes a practical difference by addressing a social, environmental or health issue. Two new prizes include  the Inspired Idea Award and a cash grant to the winner’s school.

Enter at  www.googlesciencefair.com

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